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Mount Rainier fall skiing photos: Panorama Point, Muir Snowfield, Paradise Glacier
Turns All Year: Previous Home Page Galleries
This is a gallery of Mount Rainier fall skiing photos which appeared on the Turns All Year home page in the past. Thumbnail images on this page can be clicked to view the full-sized photos, and lead into a slide show sequence for the gallery. The photos are from a late October backcountry skiing trip to the south side of Mount Rainier, from Paradise up to the Muir Snowfield, then skiing down the Paradise Glacier on generally great snow.
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Turns All Year CD-ROM

The complete version of this photo gallery is now available on Turns All Year CD-ROM. Below you can view thumbnail photos from this gallery.

Turns All Year CD-ROM contains over 180 photo galleries, containing more than 3200 full-sized photos, from backcountry skiing and snowboarding trips in the Pacific Northwest.

from October 30, 2006:
October 27, 2006, fall skiing, Muir Snowfield, Paradise Glacier, Mount Rainier, Washington
Steve takes in the view from near Alta Vista
Steve takes in the view
from near Alta Vista
Skinning into the void above Panorama Point
Skinning into the void
above Panorama Point
Breaking out of the clouds just above Pebble Creek
Breaking out of the clouds
just above Pebble Creek
Skinning on the shiny icicle layer on the Muir Snowfield
Skinning on the shiny icicle
layer on the Muir Snowfield
Wind affected snow below Moon Rocks, with Gibraltar Rock (left) and Anvil Rock (center)
Wind affected snow
below Moon Rocks
Steve skiing some interesting snow on the upper Paradise Glacier
Steve skiing some interesting
snow, upper Paradise Glacier
Steve skiing wind-etched snow on the Paradise Glacier, with Cowlitz Glacier beyond
Skiing wind-etched snow
on the Paradise Glacier
Steve on Paradise Glacier with Cowlitz Glacier beyond
Steve on Paradise Glacier
with Cowlitz Glacier beyond
Steve enjoys great snow lower on the Paradise Glacier
Steve enjoys great snow
lower on the Paradise Glacier
Gliding to another Paradise Glacier roll, with Unicorn Peak surrounded by clouds, and Mount Adams
Gliding to a roll, with Unicorn
Peak and Mount Adams
Multi-Steve skiing action, Paradise Glacier, Mount Rainier
Multi-Steve skiing action
Multi-Steve skiing action close-up
Multi-Steve skiing action
close-up
Having fun
Having fun
Steve skiing Paradise Glacier
Steve skiing Paradise Glacier
Skiing back toward the fog, Paradise Glacier
Skiing back toward the fog,
Paradise Glacier
Lower part of Ron's Edge, Paradise Glacier, with Little Tahoma at right
Lower part of Ron's Edge,
with Little Tahoma
Steve skiing the lowest Muir Snowfield patch, above Pebble Creek
Skiing lowest Muir Snowpatch,
above Pebble Creek
Muir Snowfield from south of Pebble Creek, with upper snowfield and Anvil Rock (top L) and lower patches (R)
Muir Snowfield: upper
snowfield and lower patches

Photos by Charles Eldridge

Backcountry skiing trip report:
Fall skiing, Muir Snowfield, Paradise Glacier, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington, October 27, 2006

   Steve and I went up the Muir Snowpatches to the base of Moon Rocks, crossed over to the Paradise Glacier, and skied down "Ron's Edge" before crossing back to the lowest Muir and skiing back to Pebble Creek. All of our skiing was above the clouds and whiteout, and the skiing below about 8500 feet was very good.
   On the drive down it looked like "clearing from south to north" as forecast, but Paradise was in dense fog, which lasted to a little above Pebble Creek. There were a few inches of snow on the ground at Paradise, and this increased to 4-8 inches above Panorama Point, with lots of deeper drifts. Very slushy on the most of the trail. We started skinning just above Panorama Point, and were able to skin all the way to our crossover point to the Paradise Glacier, about 8900 feet. There was very interesting snow between 7000 and 8500 feet. The top inch of "snow" looked like a layer of horizontal icicles, 1 to 1.5 inches long, each one solid ice but not frozen to the others. Underneath was soft moist snow which made a good base for skinning. The wind picked up above 8000 feet, and there were large areas where the new snow had been extensively eroded. The Muir snowfield along side Moon Rocks looked dirty and as if it had been blasted, and blowing snow above signalled that the wind was strong there, so we choose to ski down the Paradise Glacier and not continue higher.
   The top section of Ron's Edge was in poor shape. Most of the new snow had been blown away and skiing was on dirty hard snow, much worse than a month before. A few hundred feet down the skiing got better due to patches of new snow, then extensive coverage. The rocks which can bar the way to the lower section were bridged by new snow, and the entire lower section featured great skiing. Those thousands of little loose icicles over soft snow skied like firn spiegel - smooth and fast. There were crevasses both visible and probably lurking under the new snow. There was also very good turning on the lowest Muir Snowpatch down to Pebble Creek. We were able to pick our way on skis back to about 7000 feet, just above Panorama Point, where we started hiking back in the fog.
   Charles

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